Review: An Abundance of Katherines

When it comes to relationships, Colin Singleton’s type is girls named Katherine. And when it comes to girls named Katherine, Colin is always getting dumped. Nineteen times, to be exact.

On a road trip miles from home, this anagram-happy, washed-up child prodigy has ten thousand dollars in his pocket, a bloodthirsty feral hog on his trail, and an overweight, Judge Judy-loving best friend riding shotgun – but no Katherines. Colin is on a mission to prove The Theorem of Underlying Katherine Predictability, which he hopes will predict the future of any relationship, avenge Dumpees everywhere, and finally win him the girl.

Love, friendship, and a dead Austro-Hungarian archduke add up to surprising and heart-changing conclusions in this ingeniously layered comic novel about reinventing oneself.–From Goodreads

John Green’s An Abundance of Katherines is a relatively light-hearted interlude between the darker Looking for Alaska and Paper Towns. While I’ve previously admitted to being an unabashed fan of John Green and Nerdfighteria, I must confess that I prefer the heavier stuff. Colin’s road trip and quest to prove himself through his theorem were interesting, but they lacked the philosophical depth of Green’s other work. Having said that, I don’t think everything needs to be deep and philosophical, so if you can go into this one with a different set of expectations, I think you’ll find it quite enjoyable.

Quotable Quotes from An Abundance of Katherines

“Books are the ultimate Dumpees: put them down and they’ll wait for you forever; pay attention to them and they always love you back.”

“…you don’t remember what happened. What you remember becomes what happened.”

“Hold on.” He grabbed a pencil and scrawled excitedly at the paper as if he’d just made a mathematical breakthrough and then looked back up at me. “I just did some calculations, and I’ve been able to determine that you’re full of shit.”

“In the first century CE, Roman authorities punished St. Apollonia by crushing her teeth one by one with pliers. Colin often thought about this in relationship to the monotony of dumping: we have thirty-two teeth. After a while, having each tooth individually destroyed probably gets repetitive, even dull. But it never stops hurting.”

“Dude, you’re such a geek. And that’s coming from an overweight Star Trek fan who scored a 5 on the AP Calculus test. So you know your condition is grave”

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